The Collection

This is one in a collection of highly detailed, quarter scale C2 radio controlled models which has taken a little over 5 years to build. That was after the 5 years it took to get the owner of the body to agree to sell it to me. My goal for this site is to document the build of this particular model and others in the collection.¬† The models were constructed in sets consisting of a chassis, hand laid fiberglass body, and mated floor pan (each body’s thickness is a little different hence each floor pan must be trimmed to match). Each car has over 300 bolts and screws, 200+ custom milled parts, 180 printed parts, two wiring harnesses, 100 plus off the shelf parts and a good bit of 3M automotive epoxy. They sport functional V8 nitro methane engines, both Conley¬† (327 or 427) and cloned Conley 327 engines. Check back for updates.

Body

Each body is hand laid by a guy with over 40 years experience in fiberglass. When people say “I gotta guy.”, and are talking about fiberglass, THIS is the guy. Part of the beauty of this model is that the actual car’s body is fiberglass. (The Corvette was made from fiberglass, because metal was still rare after WW2 rationing.) These bodies could of course be 3D printed, but the artistist expression in automotive design is hand done in clay modeling. Many auto designers say the clay allows them to spot flaws in the digital renderings. Auto body repair personnel use a keen eye and touch to do the same, especially when working with fiberglass. The lines on the C2 must be deserving of the attention, after all, “they don’t write songs about Volvos.”.

Chassis

The C2 chassis in quarter scale features a modular front end sub assembly, straight axle or IRS, 4 wheel disk brakes, Turbine or Cragar wheels, sway bars, water cooled 327 or 427 V8 engine, and much more.

Frame

The C2 chassis was born of smarts and not accepting no for an answer.  From its lower center of gravity, to is “parts bin” collection of components that made up the IRS and everything in between, the chassis was totally adaptable and proved itself as such.  During the chassis’ 20 year run, it spawned several racer kits on its’ way to spirited street driving notoriety and racing history.  And though the chassis looks crude by today’s standards, it did pave the way for the current Corvette Stingray to be named the 2020 MotorTrend Car of the Year.  That makes it one of the best cars the world has to offer, which is no small feat by any measure. This chassis allowed the C2 to break the mold, take on all comers, and win. It’s the very definition of “BADASS”.